A Little Fall Style…

Living in Southern California, the changing of the seasons is not always obvious and sometimes, it seems that the only sign is the change in the time when the sun rises. However, we’re not completely immune to Fall’s influence… in the course of researching another topic, we came across a series of dresses in shades of plum, violet, and lavender as suggested in this palette:

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And here’s the dress- a day dress from circa 1893:

Day Dress c. 1893

Bourdereau Veron & Cie, Place de la Bourse, Paris, Day Dress, c. 1893; Kent State University Museum (1983.1.207 ab)

Day Dress c. 1893

Rear View

Although lighting and computer monitors can influence colors, it’s still evident that the bodice and over-skirt are constructed of a lighter shade of a rose color while the underskirt and bodice front are more of a burgundy/brown. Also, the use of black beading on the front also further darken the dress front.

Day Dress c. 1893

Side Profile

Day Dress c. 1893

Close-up of front bodice (not sure why it was cropped this way).

Day Dress c. 1893

Close-up of bodice back.

The bodice back shows off interesting floral pattern that’s on the bodice back, sleeves, and over-skirt; note how it’s been precisely pieced together on the center back so that the pattern is uninterrupted. That’s our take for now on Fall colors for 2018 but we’ll be back with more in the future. 🙂

 

In The UK- Part 3

Today we took a train trip out into the English countryside and met up with some friends and visited Waddeston Manor. Located close to Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, the house was built between 1874 and 1889 by the Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild (1839–1898) as a weekend retreat for entertaining plus as a venue to house his art collection. The architectural style is a Neo-Renaissance (or Renaissance Revival style) and is quite elaborate and not the usual Victorian style that one normally sees in England.

To get an idea of the scale of the house, here’s an overhead view:

 Aerial view of Waddesdon from the north

And from the front:

The above images are borrowed from Wikipedia since my cell phone camera just wasn’t working right that day. And here’s mine:

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And now for a few interior views:

The Red Drawing Room:

 

Waddesdon Manor

Waddesdon Manor

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And there was quite an extensive collection of chinaware of all kinds…

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And then, unexpectedly, there were some Elizabethan era portraits by Nicholas Hilliard:

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And here are some close-up views of the portraiture. First, there Queen Elizabeth:

Sir Amias Paulet:

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester:

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It was an interesting tour and the crowds weren’t too bad (it was a weekday). Style-wise, the house was mostly decorated in 18th Century style- Rothschild had acquired a large amount of furniture, decorate elements, paintings, et al., mostly from France a la William Randolph Hearst but with much better taste. What also amazing is that the Waddesdon Manor was much more than just a big house, it was a whole self-contained community complete with it’s own workshops and even a power plant- basically, the manor was one of the largest employers in the area and the work was steady even during the Depression of 1893.

One newly-reopened area of the manor were the wine cellars and they were amazing:

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And yes, they offer wine tastings on a periodic basis…. 🙂

For us, touring Waddesdon Manor was an amazing experience and it exposed us to a lot of things that we normally just see in pictures or in museums, devoid of context. The richness of colors were very inspiring and it reinforced our current leaning towards saturated colors and jewel tones- it’s such a contrast to Southern California. We’re still thinking about this marvelous place and we’ll be commenting on it in future posts.

After our visit, we retired to a local pub for dinner and then caught a late train for London…

(To be continued…)

 

And For Some Style From Maison Rouff

Maison Rouff Card 1910.

Recently, we came across this interesting evening dress style that was offered by Maison Rouff from circa 1895:

Rouff Evening Dress c. 1895

Maison Rouff, Evening Dress, c. 1895; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.2339a, b)

Rouff Evening Dress c. 1895

Three-Quarter Rear View

The interesting thing about this style is incorporation of a short sleeve jacket/vest into the bodice, reminiscent of an 18th Century waist coat. This is a feature that’s not usually encountered in evening dress styles of the 1890s (at least what we’ve come across so far). Here’s a close-up of the back of the bodice:

Rouff Evening Dress c. 1895

Close-up detail of bodice back.

The dress and under-bodice look like a fairly conventional silk chiffon with a silk underskirt but where the jacket/vest definitely gives this a unique look. We would love to know more about this imaginative dress. 🙂

 

A Little Catch-Up…

Things have been hectic at the atelier- between receiving shipments of the fabric that we’d bought in the UK and catching up various housekeeping chores, it’s a wonder that there’s time for actual sewing… 🙂 Well, after a long break, I was finally able to finish up on a few vest projects that I’d been working on for awhile. Here’s one of them:

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The above vest is constructed from a pattern made by Laughing Moon that I modified for my height. The above example is the second I’ve made using this pattern and overall, it went smoothly. The pattern is based on period originals and as with the originals, there are no short-cuts- patience and and attention to detail are critical. For materials, I used a lightweight herring bone weave dark rust-colored wool combined with a lining of black polished cotton. I’ll definitely be using this pattern in the future. 🙂

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In The UK – Part 2

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After a short break, we decided to head east to Soho and check out a few of the fabric stores that we’d previous planned for. Our first stop was MacCulloch & Wallis. There was a variety of fabrics available mostly focused on cottons and silk, (although there was also a wool section) and while much wasn’t anything we couldn’t obtain here in LA, there were some stand-outs that caught our eye:

London Fabric

There were a number of cotton/silk brocades in a variety of colors as seen above. Here’s a sampling of what we bought:

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Adam London

Checking out the fabrics at MacCulloch & Wallis…

London Cloth House

Our next stop was the Cloth House. Although the store was small (everything is small in London, it seems… 🙂 ), it was packed with some interesting fabrics, primarily cottons and cotton/silk mixes (or so it seemed). We didn’t a lot that was useful but the few things we did find were exquisite but unfortunately, almost none of them were available in enough quantity for a dress length- apparently they stock most of their fabrics in 5 meter increments so if your timing is off, you’re out of luck (although they can restock on some fabrics). Here are a couple of cotton prints we walked away with…can you sense the “Liberty London” vibe here? 🙂

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Next, while we weren’t specifically looking for wool, we walked into Borovick Fabrics on a whim and walked out with this beautiful plaid:

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The nice think about this wool is that it’s a medium weight and it will work for Southern California- normally, there’s simply no real opportunities to wear wool, at least not like in the UK. We bought enough yardage for a complete sack suit and vest… 🙂 And then we decided to take a break at the local Cafe Nero before moving on….

(To be continued….)