Some 1900s Style At The Atelier

Still patiently hand finishing the applique work on this dress so I can finally work on the bodice. Are any of you still working on finishing Quarantine dresses? I predict we’ll all emerge like butterflies. 🦋

 



Modernless March

Day One of #modernlessmarch hosted by @pinsent_tailoring is: “What am I?”
I’ve been an Artist all my life, after I retired from being LA City Calligrapher, we jumped into Lily Absinthe full time. Our time is divided between our Woodland Hills house and our Victorian house in Tombstone, Arizona…and always with Angus and Fiona, our two fur peeps. Bringing old things to life is how I approach projects, old houses, old lace, old hats, old gowns, old sewing machines…they all need some love and a little magic. 🙂

 

 



Juicy Details…

Day Day 10 of #VictorianFebruary is: “Juicy Details” and there’s nothing like a bit of ruffly scandal to raise some eyebrows! The best details are usually hidden during a promenade. 🙂



And For Some Dress Inspiration From c. 1903

Looking for early 1900s day dresses but not the lingerie dress style? Well, here’s an interesting alternative from circa 1903:

Day Dress, c. 1903; FIDM Museum (79.25.12A-C)

Unfortunately, there’s not a lot of detail on specific dress materials, except to say that silk is one of the materials, so short of a physical inspection, it’s somewhat speculation on our part but it’s probable that the fashion fabric is either a silk print or has woven stripes. Velvet is also indicated as another material and more likely present in the trim running along the bottom and middle hems, bodice front, and collar. Finally, lace is also indicated and that’s pretty obvious looking at the middle hem, shoulders, and collar.  Stripes have often been used as a dramatic style element and when used judiciously, they can take an otherwise average dress and make it into something fantastic as with the day dress.

The side profile really shows up the “pouter pigeon” look created by the S-Bend corset.

The train nicely shows off the vertical stiped effect. Daywear styles in the 1900-1905 time frame were dominated by lingerie/lingerie style dresses and this is what tends to stick in people’s minds when considering this period. The above dress stands out as a major exception and certainly provides some food for thought. Stay tuned for more! 🙂

And For Some Artistic Inspiration…

Today we offer a little artistic inspiration by way of this portrait of the Princesse de Broglie that was painted by James Tissot in 1895:

James Tissot, The Princesse de Broglie, 1895

The first thing that caught our eye was Tissot’s use of analogous colors with shades of green on the cape and shades of yellow on the dress. The green colors on the cape are especially interesting in that we see shades of color accentuated by various textures: light green feathers for trim, slightly darker green on the pleated silk collar, and a variegated fashion fabric of gold and green. The overall effect is amazing. The evening dress the sitter is wearing definitely takes second place with a yellow fashion fabric trimmed with a darker yellow on the hem, collar, and belt.  Finally, to tie it all together, there’s a choker collar of dark blue with gold that immediately draws the eye to the sitter’s face. Tissot has done a brilliant job here and one can almost feel a visual harmony of coolness, evoking a sense of spring and summer and some reason our minds are drawn to Monet’s home at Giverny…

 

In terms of garments, greens have always been a favorite with us and many of our designs have incorporated similar colors:

We have by no means exhausted the design possibilities using these colors and anticipate creating more designs in the future. 🙂