More From The FIDM Museum…

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e at Lily Absinthe make a point of often visiting the FIDM Museum. The exhibits are updated often and there’s always something that exquisite to see and rarely do we go away not being inspired. 🙂 As a follow-up to yesterday’s post, here’s a little more about what we saw there. First, we have a mantle, c. 1885, designed by Charles Worth:

Worth 1885

Worth 1885

This coat is constructed a silk velvet/brocade trimmed with sable. Although it’s not easy to make out, the brocade design is that of a pineapple (one could argue that the choice of pineapple was apt since it was considered an expensive luxury). Definitely intended for a cold climate (with temperatures running abound 103, the Californian in us shudders), the mantle was intended to provide total coverage and is shaped to accommodate the underlying bustled dress.

Next up, is this c. 1908 afternoon dress designed by Liberty & Company, Ltd.:

FIDM Liberty of London 1908

FIDM Liberty of London 1908

The dress silhouette is characteristic of the later 1900s and while it was no doubt work with an s-bend corset underneath, it’s fairly muted (although that can simply be the staging). The bodice and skirt are made from a gray silk/silk chiffon, trimmed with embroidered silk flowers along the lapels of the bodice, sleeves, and waist. The bodice is designed with a front opening to simulate a jacket with a lace/gauze waist underneath.

FIDM Liberty of London 1908

FIDM Liberty of London 1908

Close-up of the embroidery detail. Liberty of London was a high-end department store in London specializing in importing fabrics from the Orient and especially Japan.

In terms of style, this represents the more conventional path when compared to a designer like Paul Poiret who, at the same time, was pushing Nouveau Directoire:

Paul Iribe 1908 Poiret Noveau Directoire

Noveau Directoire 1908 Poiret Josephine Dress

Paul Poiret, Day Dress, 1908; Les Arts Décoratifs

 It’s quite a contrast…

Well, that concludes our most recent trip to the FIDM Museum. Stay tuned for more posts in the future about this most remarkable place. 🙂

At The FIDM Museum…

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ne of the most overlooked museums in Los Angeles is the FIDM Museum. Located in Downtown Los Angeles, the FIDM Museum has maintains a small but excellent collection of fashion-related items (well, small when compared to the Met in New York 🙂 ). As noted in a previous post, we recently visited the museum to view the 11th Outstanding Art of Television Costume Design Exhibition. However, there was also an exhibit of historical garments from the Linda and Steven Plochocki Collection on display which, naturally, we had to also see.

On display were a number of examples from various eras to include our favorite, the 19th Century. First, is this stunning wedding dress designed in 1878 by Emile Pingat:

FIDM Pingat

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The upright silhouette is characteristic of the Mid-Bustle Era, and as such, the bustle/tornure is fairly minimal. At the same time, we see a full train outlined with a wide band of ruffled pleating. The dress is made from an ivory/champagne silk; the overskirt is smooth with  little adornment except for a band of ruffled net/silk band trim accented with strings of flowers and orange blossoms (a signature Victorian trim for wedding dresses). The underskirt has vertical pleats which presents a nice contrast to the plain overskirt. The bodice is a deep cuirass bodice with three-quarter sleeves, trimmed in silk ribbons and lace, especially around the neck.

Here’s a few more views:

FIDM Pingat

FIDM Pingat

FIDM Pingat

The orange blossoms and lace trim frame the front opening of the overskirt.

FIDM Pingat

Detail of sleeve treatment of lace and silk ribbon.

FIDM Pingat 1878

Detail of bustle.

FIDM Pingat

Here’s a close-up of the orange blossom trim. Originally utilized by Queen Victoria in her wedding dress in 1840, it rapidly became a fashion trend for wedding dressed throughout the mid to late 19th Century.

FIDM Pingat

 

The trim running along the skirt hem and the edges of the train is actually a netting that’s trimmed with silk tape on one edge. The wedding dress is a stunning example of Pingat’s work and it bears further study.

Next, is a bodice from c. 1898 designed by Jacques Doucet:

FIDM Doucet

FIDM Doucet

FIDM Doucet

FIDM Doucet

FIDM Doucet

This bodice contains the signature elements characteristic of Doucet’s designs- rich old gold silk fabric trimmed with lace and lace appliques, some incorporating metallic gold thread. From a silhouette perspective, the leg-of-mutton sleeves are restrained, characteristic of late 1890s styles. The bodice is shaped like a jacket, reminiscent of 18th Century styles with a shirred gauze waist with a silk satin wide belt. Overall, it’s a rich, powerful style. It’s a pity that the skirt has not survived- the total package was no doubt a complete knock-out.

Well, that’s all for today. We hope you’ve enjoyed this as much as we did going to the FIDM Museum. 🙂

 

 

The 11th Outstanding Art of Television Costume Design Exhibition At FIDM

Yesterday, we decided to take a small break and head down to Downtown Los Angeles to check out the 11th Outstanding Art of Television Costume Design Exhibition at FIDM. This is a display of costumes from various Emmy-nominated television shows and serves as the television counterpart to the Annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibitions. Now we fully admit that we tend to be somewhat subjective about what catches our eye and most of the shows that featured are ones that we have not seen so with that in mind, let’s proceed…

From a 19th Century standpoint- sort of- the first stand-out were two outfits from the HBO series Westworld:

The first is worn by one of the principle characters, Maeve:

Westworld

And here it is on the show:

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The outfit is also seen with a full skirt:

Image result for westworld maeve

And just because, here’s a close up of the fabrics from the FIDM Museum Blog:

And then there’s Maeve’s companion Clementine:

Westworld

Image result for westworld maeve

Moving on, here’s an assortment of pictures from a variety of shows…

Now for something different, here’s one of Queen Elizabeth’s gowns from the Netflix series The Crown:

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And “live”…

Elizabeth (Claire Foy) and Philip (Matt Smith) smile for a paparazzi moment. Photo: Netflix

I’ll admit, the reasons I was drawn to this one was because of the color combination of a dark celadon/gray combined with taupe bodice and overskirt. Very simple, yet elegant, and it’s a color combination that may make an appearance in one of our designs. 🙂

Now for something different, here are two costumes from the Amazon series The Collection:

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And a close-up, courtesy of the FIDM Museum Blog:

FullSizeRender

What is especially striking is the coordinated arrangement of the various striped fabric pieces combined with the use of lavender- it’s very striking and overall dress silhouette gives a “New Look” feel (well, the show IS about a Paris fashion house in the Postwar years… 🙂 ). Now for something a bit more dramatic:

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And here’s a picture of the dress “live”:

The Collection (2016)

We really need to watch the show… 🙂

Well, that’s a brief look of what we saw at the FIDM Museum and as usual, we were not disappointed and it definitely held our attention. From a period (i.e. 19th Century) perspective, there was little that grabbed our attention but we take  our inspiration from all periods (especially 1946-60 recently) and don’t be surprised if some of that appears in our designs. That’s all for now! 🙂

And We’re Back!

Adam_Doc Holliday Parade1 Tombstone

It was a quick and busy past weekend in Tombstone followed by a one-hour drive back to LA on Monday but we’ve recovered. 🙂 So, the reason for being there? The Inaugural Doc-Holli-Days event weekend, a tribute event to Doc Holliday and the movie Tombstone with Val Kilmer as the guest of honor (naturally!). To accompany Val were many of the cast members from the movie (unfortunately, no Sam Elliott) and it was one big party in town the entire weekend- the crowds were estimated to have been around 20,000 (although I tend to take official estimates with a grain of salt)- but no matter what, the town was definitely crowded, something we haven’t seen in a long time.

Our role in this event was limited to marching in the official parade, which had Val as the grand marshal, with the participants portraying their favorite characters from the movie Tombstone. I portrayed the photographer CS Fly and I even had a small 1880s vintage camera (I plan on restoring it in the future). Overall, it was a fun event although the weather was brutal- the humidity was a real killer. Plans are afoot to hold this event again next year and we’re looking forward to it. 🙂

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Time for a beer, it’s been a long day!