And Still More 1890s Style…(We’re On A Roll Here)

Yes, we’re on a roll here…it seems to be shaping up into 1890s week (or maybe month). Here’s another great dress we came across while looking for something completely different (funny how that always seems to happen). For today’s consideration is this ball gown that was made by Pingat sometime around 1894:

Pingat, Ball Gown, c. 1894; Museum of Fine Arts Boston (56.816)

Rear View

As ball gowns go, this is a relatively simple design with a minimum of trim (mostly beading on the front bodice), relying instead on combinations of lace, and silk satin to achieve its effect.  With roses strategically placed on the skirt front, collar and shoulder, there are pops of color that offset the blush pink/ivory silk satin. The gigot sleeves combined with gored skirt definitely place this dress safely in the mid-1890s and create the classic hourglass style that was typical of the period. Overall, as with many of Pingat’s designs, this is elegant and clean and would definitely make an excellent bridal gown. Although best know for his outerwear, Pingat also produced many elegant dress designs- ball gowns, evening/reception dresses and day dresses and this is just one excellent example.

And For A Few More From The Vyne…

We’re still sorting through all the pictures that we took in England and here are some more from our trip to The Vyne, an historic manor house located close to Basingstoke in Hampshire. First, here’s another picture of us…the red in the day dress really stands out in the grey background lighting:

And here are a couple with a good friend of ours:  🙂

Here are two of the chapel:

And one of the well-appointed sitting rooms:

And the tomb of Chaloner Chute, himself:

Here’s a better picture that I borrowed from online:

Image result for chaloner chute tomb

And finally, Henry VIII himself:

A Day In The Country…

While we were away in England, we had the opportunity to visit The Vyne, an historic manor house located close to Basingstoke in Hampshire. Originally built between 1500 and 1520 for William Sandys, Henry VIII’s Lord Chamberlain, the house was later acquired in 1653 by Chaloner Chute, a successful barrister and remained in the Chute family until it was acquired by the National Trust. Over the years, the house has been progressively added onto and is a pastiche of various styles ranging from early Tudor through the 19th Century. One of the most interesting aspects is that the house contained a small chapel, complete with stained glass windows.  The day we visited, it was cold, windy, and overcast but that didn’t deter us any, we managed to get a number of very nice pictures.

First is the exterior:

This is the back side of the main house. To the left is an outbuilding.

The front of the house.

The Vyne Tudor Mansion, National Trust

Here’s a better view of the house, courtesy of the National Trust.

And now some of the interior:

And now for us… 🙂

A little humor for the camera…my reaction after receiving the latest bill from Charles Worth.

Yes, it’s all mine (or so I’d like to believe)…

Karin modeling her latest creation- a late 1880s day dress.

Visiting The Vyne was one of the major high points of our visit to England and it was definitely worth braving the cold and damp. The estate provided a wonderful backdrop for picture-taking and we only wish that the weather had permitted us to get some more pictures of us outside. We would definitely love to visit again in the Spring when the all the plants are in full bloom. All in all, a special day. 🙂

Trending For Christmas & New Years…1878

The late 1870s has always been a source of fascination for us and recently, we came across some interesting fashion plates published by The Young Ladies Journal dating from that period. To us, it’s simply amazing that wide variety of styles and colors that were available as depicted in this fashion plate:

The Young Ladies Journal, Christmas & New Years, 1878

What we find especially interesting is that there seemingly was no set “holiday color palette” like one sees today. What’s also interesting is that colors range from the jewel tones to pale pastels (something normally associated with the spring and summer months). Now, making allowances for artistic license in regard to colors, the styles themselves are still even considered on their own. And no surprise, the various pleatings and ruffles all serve to emphasize the cylindrical silhouette characteristic of this period.

So just in case you’re lacking in holiday inspiration, this should help.  🙂