Taking a Turn Around Hjo, Redux

Our trip to Sweden gave me an opportunity really put my 1890s wardrobe through its paces and it was a total success. The weather and location were perfect and it all came together nicely.


Enjoying a twirl outside a gorgeous 1898 Swedish country house and hoping it doesn’t rain! I had fun today wearing (finally) my new 90s gown with all the restored extant embroidery. We come home to the US on Monday, then I can post the photos from the original museum gown before it was restored and answer questions like: “how did you get your sleeves to stay that big” and other fun thoughts one learns along the way. It’s fun to wear history when one can, but it’s a piece that will require gentle care. The hat is a deaccsession museum piece…another piece that requires gentle handling. The parasol I recovered in silk, then used one of my original lace covers.

NOTE: The video actually plays with the correct side up.



On Year Ago In Sweden…

One year ago we were spending our Labor Day weekend in Hjo, Sweden and the end of Summer there is definitely different from Southern California! 😉


Adjusting epaulets and hats turning into sails, Sweden’s Summer is not like what we have in LA…more hairpins, please!



The Palais Galliera Reopening

We’re happy to announce that the Palais Galliera in Paris is finally opening on October 1, 2020! While it appears that they’ll be adhering to their policy of having specific exhibitions rather than maintaining a permanent collection on display (at least what we can gather from the official press release and the website). A visit to the Palais has always been high on our list of must-sees in Paris but it’s been closed for the past several years so hopefully we can go there the next time we’re in Paris. The downside is that while they have an extensive collection, it’s all in storage and the only time anything is on public display is if there’s an exhibition (it would be nice if they had an organized photo archive, but alas, no).

As a warm-up, you might recall that the Palais holds this tea dress that once belonged to the Countess Greffuhle:

Tea Dress, Worth c. 1895; Palais Galliera (GAL1964.20.4)

And one of her evening dresses:

Worth, Evening Dress, Worth, 1896; Palais Galliera, musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris (GAL1978.20.1)

So here’s hoping to maybe being able to see these up close and personal one day! 🙂



Pingat- Early 1890s Outerwear

Emile Pingat was one of the leading Parisian couturiers during the late 19th Century and was especially known for his outerwear. We first begin with this circa 1891 mantle:

Pingat, Mantle, c. 1891; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.337)

This cape is constructed from a pale blue wool overlaid with metallic gold bullion and gray velvet appliques that create a floral design motif. Trimming the front, cuffs, and collar are turquoise feathers.

Pingat, Mantle, c. 1891; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.337)

The side profile gives a good view of the typical mantle profile- long in the front and short in the rear to accommodate the bustled train, or in this case, a more truncated train created by a bustle pad. And to get an idea of how it would have looked worn with a dress:

Interestingly enough, it appears that the dress underneath is this 1893 evening dress by Worth:

Worth, Evening Ensemble Dress, 1893; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.622a–c)

Of course, this also raises the question of putting on the mantle over the dress’s gigot sleeves…. 😉

Below is another example of Pingat’s work from the early 1890s, this time a cape dated to circa 1891-1893:

Pingat, Cape, c. 1891-1893; Metropolitan Museum of Art (C.I.60.6.8)

This cape is constructed of a black silk velvet and trimmed with fur along the front and the collar. Running along the front and up onto the shoulders are strips of a silver jeweled trim; at the shoulders, the trim accentuates the epaulets and makes them stand out as a design feature. Also, the color is also trimmed with the same type of silver jeweled trim. Below is another view of the cape’s opening:

It’s hard to completely discern but it appears that the cape opens on the front sides. The lining material is also interesting as can be seen with the label:

 

The silver jeweled trim continues on the back in a dramatic manner, using most of the back and really takes over to create a very opulent look.

Rear View

The above two garments only give a hint at Pingat’s amazing design skills and in future posts, we’ll looking at some more examples. Stay tuned! 🙂



And For Some Artistic Inspiration…

Today we offer a little artistic inspiration by way of this portrait of the Princesse de Broglie that was painted by James Tissot in 1895:

James Tissot, The Princesse de Broglie, 1895

The first thing that caught our eye was Tissot’s use of analogous colors with shades of green on the cape and shades of yellow on the dress. The green colors on the cape are especially interesting in that we see shades of color accentuated by various textures: light green feathers for trim, slightly darker green on the pleated silk collar, and a variegated fashion fabric of gold and green. The overall effect is amazing. The evening dress the sitter is wearing definitely takes second place with a yellow fashion fabric trimmed with a darker yellow on the hem, collar, and belt.  Finally, to tie it all together, there’s a choker collar of dark blue with gold that immediately draws the eye to the sitter’s face. Tissot has done a brilliant job here and one can almost feel a visual harmony of coolness, evoking a sense of spring and summer and some reason our minds are drawn to Monet’s home at Giverny…

 

In terms of garments, greens have always been a favorite with us and many of our designs have incorporated similar colors:

We have by no means exhausted the design possibilities using these colors and anticipate creating more designs in the future. 🙂