And Still More 1890s Style…(We’re On A Roll Here)

Yes, we’re on a roll here…it seems to be shaping up into 1890s week (or maybe month). Here’s another great dress we came across while looking for something completely different (funny how that always seems to happen). For today’s consideration is this ball gown that was made by Pingat sometime around 1894:

Pingat, Ball Gown, c. 1894; Museum of Fine Arts Boston (56.816)

Rear View

As ball gowns go, this is a relatively simple design with a minimum of trim (mostly beading on the front bodice), relying instead on combinations of lace, and silk satin to achieve its effect.  With roses strategically placed on the skirt front, collar and shoulder, there are pops of color that offset the blush pink/ivory silk satin. The gigot sleeves combined with gored skirt definitely place this dress safely in the mid-1890s and create the classic hourglass style that was typical of the period. Overall, as with many of Pingat’s designs, this is elegant and clean and would definitely make an excellent bridal gown. Although best know for his outerwear, Pingat also produced many elegant dress designs- ball gowns, evening/reception dresses and day dresses and this is just one excellent example.

Holiday Greetings From London!

This year we decided to change things up for Christmas so we’re spending it in London. 🙂 Yes, you heard right, London like in London, England. 2018 has been an exceptionally busy year for us, between various projects and travelling, it’s been a crazy but fun time for us. We want to take this moment to with all our clients and followers Happy Holidays and a Merry Christmas! We’ll have more soon so stay tuned. 🙂

 

Trending For Christmas & New Years…1878

The late 1870s has always been a source of fascination for us and recently, we came across some interesting fashion plates published by The Young Ladies Journal dating from that period. To us, it’s simply amazing that wide variety of styles and colors that were available as depicted in this fashion plate:

The Young Ladies Journal, Christmas & New Years, 1878

What we find especially interesting is that there seemingly was no set “holiday color palette” like one sees today. What’s also interesting is that colors range from the jewel tones to pale pastels (something normally associated with the spring and summer months). Now, making allowances for artistic license in regard to colors, the styles themselves are still even considered on their own. And no surprise, the various pleatings and ruffles all serve to emphasize the cylindrical silhouette characteristic of this period.

So just in case you’re lacking in holiday inspiration, this should help.  🙂