And Happy New Years At No. 11…

Off to our No. 11 in Tombstone this long weekend, all that fun holiday stuff has to get packed away and the sewing room disassembled…because during the next Phase of Old House Restoration, that room will become the guest room, then more foundation work, then a room addition, and so on… Missing the Little House, but happy to say we’ll be out there more often.  🙂

And the obligatory selfie…

Angus and I modeling our latest fashions…

And Still More 1890s Style…(We’re On A Roll Here)

Yes, we’re on a roll here…it seems to be shaping up into 1890s week (or maybe month). Here’s another great dress we came across while looking for something completely different (funny how that always seems to happen). For today’s consideration is this ball gown that was made by Pingat sometime around 1894:

Pingat, Ball Gown, c. 1894; Museum of Fine Arts Boston (56.816)

Rear View

As ball gowns go, this is a relatively simple design with a minimum of trim (mostly beading on the front bodice), relying instead on combinations of lace, and silk satin to achieve its effect.  With roses strategically placed on the skirt front, collar and shoulder, there are pops of color that offset the blush pink/ivory silk satin. The gigot sleeves combined with gored skirt definitely place this dress safely in the mid-1890s and create the classic hourglass style that was typical of the period. Overall, as with many of Pingat’s designs, this is elegant and clean and would definitely make an excellent bridal gown. Although best know for his outerwear, Pingat also produced many elegant dress designs- ball gowns, evening/reception dresses and day dresses and this is just one excellent example.

And For A Few More From The Vyne…

We’re still sorting through all the pictures that we took in England and here are some more from our trip to The Vyne, an historic manor house located close to Basingstoke in Hampshire. First, here’s another picture of us…the red in the day dress really stands out in the grey background lighting:

And here are a couple with a good friend of ours:  🙂

Here are two of the chapel:

And one of the well-appointed sitting rooms:

And the tomb of Chaloner Chute, himself:

Here’s a better picture that I borrowed from online:

Image result for chaloner chute tomb

And finally, Henry VIII himself: