Spring Is Here!

Springtime promenade in the latest 1898 style, now to take this back to Tombstone and get my Victorian Old West on!


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Walking Around Bath – The Coca Cola Dress Returns!

It’s a sunny day in Bath and we didn’t miss the opportunity to show off the Coca Cola dress! 😁 First to get ready…

Yeah, checking the latest e-mails… 😁

The out we go! First stop was this nice, shady park area just by the Royal Crescent:

This park was the perfect place to model the dress- all kinds of shade and natural lighting.

And Voila! The Royal Crescent!

It was a busy day with a lot of people visiting Bath…

We wish we could have worked it so there was no modernisms in the background but there’s only so much you can do…

It was an incredibly beautiful, sunny day in Bath and we took full advantage of it. We’re looking forward to returning in the future to model more dresses! 😁


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And Now For Some Bees…

And to continue the natural world theme in yesterday’s post, today we feature a lingerie dress that was created by Jacques Doucet around 1900-1905, only this time utilizing bees:

Doucet, Day Dress, c. 1900-1905; Les Arts Décoratifs

In many respects, this dress style follows the lingerie dress style that was prevalent for warm weather daywear during the early 1900s, an area that Doucet excelled. This dress is constructed of layers of semi-sheer fabrics (probably batiste and/or organza) combined with lace and features a multi-layer train that alternates the fashion fabric with the lace. However, the centerpiece of this dress is the use of a decorative floral motif featuring bees. The bees themselves appear to be embroidered appliques and are artfully arranged running up the dress front to suggest bees buzzing about flying out of the vegetation.  One can definitely see that vertical lines are emphasized, especially with the dress front designed as a front-opening robe; the swarm of bees run all the way up the dress front and around the neckline to the back. Compared to many lingerie dresses of the period, the use of lace is fairly restrained and is not allowed to detract from the bee decoration. Below is a rear view:


The rear is also interesting in that the bees are set along the hem of the our dress layer to suggest low-lying vegetation and when viewed together with the front, the effect is very three-dimensional. This is more than a simple static decorative motif being applied to a dress, this has been well thought out. The dress itself is fairly simple design, acting as a canvas for the decorative design. This dress is definitely an inspiration for future recreated designs. 🙂


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