And For Some More 1890s Outerwear

I‘s been especially cold lately in Southern California and once again, thoughts turn to outerwear…😄


Even in Southern California (and Southern Arizona, for that matter), December can get cold and when it does, our thoughts rapidly turn to outerwear.  🙂 Today we turn to the December 1890 issue of Demorest’s Family Magazine:

Decidedly the most popular outdoor garment this season is the jacket, which is worn by ladies of all ages, whether of petite or portly figure. All styles agree in having the fitted back, differing only in the use or omission of plaits or lap at the side-form and back seams, and the majority have tight-fitting fronts, either single or double-breasted, the loose fronted “Reefer,” and the open, rolling fronts displaying a vest, being the exceptions.

Here’s some examples of styles pictured in Demorest’s:

One of the more interesting and eminently practical is the “Reefer” Jacket:


Here’s another view of the jacket style as part of a complete outfit from the December issue of Peterson’s Magazine:

Finally, just to round things off here are some pictures of extant originals:

Jacket, c. 1891; Auction in AntiqueDress.com

Skirt Suit Jacket, c. 1895; Victoria & Albert Museum (T.173&A-1969)

Afternoon Jacket, Emile Pingat, c. 1885 – 1890; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.76)

Jackets were an integral part of any wardrobe of the period, ranging from the purely functional to the extremely fashionable, and there’s a wide range of possibilities for those recreating historical fashions.



And For A Little 1890s Outerwear

Brrr…it’s a bit cold here in Southern California with a hint of rain to come and we can’t help but think of jackets and especially 1890s jackets. 😁 Here’s a nice circa 1895 example from the FIDM Museum:

Jacket, c. 1895; FIDM Museum

Constructed of a black (at least from what we can tell in the photos), this jacket definitely reads mid-1890s with it’s Medici collar, gigot sleeves, nipped waist and flaring peplum.  The silhouette is simple with an emphasis on function but it’s immaculately tailored with understated trim in the form of black soutache.

The black soutache work is amazing:

This is an amazing example- both functional and elegant. We’re definitely feeling inspired now! 😁



Some 1890s Style

Some styles can be extremely compelling and that’s especially to when it comes to the 1890s jacket and jacket/bodice styles. Here’s one from the Musée Galliera de la Mode de la Ville de Paris that really caught our eye:

Jacket,  c. 1890s; Musée Galliera de la Mode de la Ville de Paris

Unfortunately there’s not a lot of detail in regard to this garment that we could find but it’s most likely later 1890s, after the extreme gigot sleeve trend had passed by. But from casual examination, it appears that the base fashion fabric appears to be fuschia-colored wool with black jet bead appliques on top. Here’s a couple of close-ups that show off the appliques better:

This jacket is the perfect example of a functional design style that’s been elevated to something more elegant and in the process transcending any idea of practicality.  This is definitely a garment that we would love to be able to view in person. Someday…. 😁


Trending- Outerwear for December 1890

In today’s post, we turn to outerwear, specifically jackets trending for December 1890. According to the December 1890 issue of Demorest’s Family Magazine, jackets:

Decidedly the most popular outdoor garment this season is the jacket, which is worn by ladies of all ages, whether of petite or portly figure. All styles agree in having the fitted back, differing only in the use or omission of plaits or lap at the side-form and back seams, and the majority have tight-fitting fronts, either single or double-breasted, the loose fronted “Reefer,” and the open, rolling fronts displaying a vest, being the exceptions.

Here’s some examples of styles pictured in Demorest’s:

One of the more interesting and eminently practical is the “Reefer” Jacket:


Here’s another view of the jacket style as part of a complete outfit from the December issue of Peterson’s Magazine:

Finally, just to round things off here are some pictures of extant originals:

Jacket, c. 1891; Auction in AntiqueDress.com

Skirt Suit Jacket, c. 1895; Victoria & Albert Museum (T.173&A-1969)

Afternoon Jacket, Emile Pingat, c. 1885 – 1890; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.76)

Jackets were an integral part of any wardrobe of the period, ranging from the purely functional to the extremely fashionable, and there’s a wide range of possibilities for those recreating historical fashions.