What’s On At The Atelier- Eton Jacket Project No. 2

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Another Eaton jacket in the works…I’m incorporating more tailoring techniques in this one so we’ll see how it turns out. 🙂

Laying out some of the fashion fabric. The lighting is really poor- the fabric is actually a teal linen.

Chalking out the pieces- The pattern pieces are actually slopers so I have to manually add the seam allowance which in this case is 1/2 inch.

Creating the canvases for the front left and right.

 

 



At The Atelier- Design Creation, Part 6

In out last post, we assembled the pieces for both the exterior fashion layer and the interior lining/facing layers for the Eton jacket.

In full disclosure, we’d like to say that this project has been an interesting learning experience in that it’s demonstrated to us that there is a lot more involved to drafting a pattern than simply drawing lines on paper following some formula, cutting out the pieces, and putting it together. A lot more. The one thing that nobody really ever discussed in pattern drafting and overall development is that once a pattern is constructed and tested out with one or more toilles, there’s still the matter of working out just how exactly the garment is going to be constructed. Of course, it’s assumed that one just knows all the relevant techniques and that bears little or nor discussion but the reality is with historical garments, there’s a lot that’s become obscure or even lost over the years. Fortunately, there are a number of references out there so it’s not an impossible task but it’s one that’s going require a lot of practice and work to master. So with that said, let’s proceed to the next steps…🙂


We now arrive at one of the most crucial stages- assembling the jacket body.

A lot more pressing is in order but overall we’re pleased with how it came together.

And now onto constructing the cuffs:

The decision to utilize turn-back cuffs was purely an aesthetic one and we could have just as easily used a number of different styles… 🙂 Here’s  the  cuffs pinned to the sleeves:

 

And voila, sleeves!

And finally, the sleeves are attached and set in the proper position. All that remains is some final touch-ups.

(To be continued…)



At The Atelier

I’m still using the same tools from my LA City Calligrapher years…they’re used for pattern drafting now. Same kind of math, just different media.

 



What’s On…

Spring is coming and things are beginning to look up a bit here in Southern California, especially on the COVID-19 front, and with it, there’s been an uptick in activity here at the atelier. We’re working up some more dress designs for future sale along with digital pattern development, and curated fabric sales. We’re especially excited about developing digit patterns and they’ll be based on originals in our collection. Finally, there’s Angus’ Attic where we’re selling curated fabrics and other odds bits from out atelier. We’d also like to add that I’m the one choosing the silks, so check them out before I start claiming them for my studio. What’s different about what we’re doing? Unlike other “sellers” on other platforms, we actually purchase the silk ahead of time and it’s here at the house already. You’re also not buying from my personal stash (I’m keeping that!), these are just selections that I think are beautiful.

 

 

 



At The Atelier- Design Creation, Part 5

In out last post, we completed construction on the canvases for the two front pieces of the Eton jacket and now it’s time to move on to completing the rest of it. As noted previously, this jacket pattern is one that we drafted utilizing a pattern drafting system developed by Charles Hecklinger in The Keystone Jacket and Dress Cutter.  So let’s move on…🙂


Turning to the sleeves, we note that these sleeves have near-90 degree elbow bends and curves which present some challenges for sewing. We found the most practical method to be to first sew and finish the inside seams first. Next, the outer seams are sewn up. We must emphasize that these require a high degree of clipping along the seam allowances and ironing in order to maintain smooth lines and preserve the shape. It’s a definitely more complicated than conventional straight sleeves.

And now, time to put together the lining:

We  decided  to use a moiré for the lining…

Above is the assembled back and side pieces…then the two fronts which combine the lining and facing fabrics:

And finally, assembling the outer layer:

And here’s the lining all assembled:

And finally the outer body:

We’re happy to say that all the pattern pieces fit together very nicely and only a minimum of adjustments were needed. It’s hanging very nicely on the mannequin and we look forward to finally putting the main body together. 🙂

(To be continued…)