More On The Ensemble Dress

Here’s another ensemble dress from Maison Worth, also from circa 1893. Style-wise, it’s similar to the example that we presented in yesterday’s post but perhaps a little more restrained. Here are a few views:

Worth 1893 Day Reception Afternoon Dress

Worth, Ensemble Dress, c. 1893; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.620a–e)

To us, this bodice reads visiting/afternoon dress, more of a formal day-oriented garment. Below, the bodice reads more of a reception dress or possibly evening dress- although that’s probably stretching things a bit.

Worth 1893 Day Reception Afternoon Dress

The Alternate Bodice

Once again, we see a jacket style for the day bodice with a filler of tulle. The skirt and jacket bodice are a pea-green silk brocade with black lace trim and accents. The night bodice with its light cinnamon colored silk velvet provides a pleasant contrast to the pea green. Compared to yesterday’s example, this dress is a bit more restrained but it’s still a nice design. The silk brocade fabric is interesting and we only wish that there were some close-up pictures of the fabric detail. It’s evident that both the dress and the one in yesterday’s post used identical or fairly similar pattern pieces. Finally, here’s an interesting part of the ensemble- matching shoes:

Worth 1893 Shoes

Matching shoes to outfit.

Stay tuned for more posts on this subject. 🙂

 


An 1883-1884 Reception Dress/Ballgown Ensemble

Ensemble dresses have always been interesting to us and today we feature one that was made by a one Alice Mason1Although Alice Mason is long gone as a concern, a quick look-up of the address on GoogleMaps reveals that it was located a block east of Saville Row. It’s clear that this was concern with an upper class clientele. in London and dated c. 1883-1884 from the Metropolitan Museum of Art that features both reception dress and ballgown bodices; the skirt is common for both but the bodices differ. First is the reception bodice:

Evening Dress Ensemble- Evening Bodice, c. 1883-1884; Metropolitan Museum of Art (C.I.54.5.1a–e)

The overall fashion fabric is a light pink/champagne silk satin with the skirt trimmed with vertical lace panels on the sides and front. Both bodices are also constructed from the same silk satin and are trimmed with ivory/champagne lace (most likely it’s yellowed a bit from age). The skirt sides are trimmed with long and wide strips of the same silk satin fashion fabric, finished with a simple demi train and some bustling towards the rear skirt top. The reception bodice features three-quarter sleeves with a square neckline lined with lace; wide lace strips matching the ones on the skirt form a “V” on the front, framing a ruched upper bodice front.  And here we see the ballgown bodice:

With The Ballgown Style Bodice

As characteristic with ballgown bodices, there’s no sleeves and shoulders are minimal, trimmed with lace. The fashion fabric on the bodice front has been shaped so as to give the effect of cross-swagging that creates a large “X” on the bodice front. The neckline is “V” shaped and also trimmed with more lace. Both bodices are high-waisted so as to facilitate the bustled/trained upper skirt. Below are some side profile views with the reception bodice:

Side View- Evening Bodice

Note the side bows and peplum on the rear of the bodice.

Three Quarter Rear View- Evening Bodice

Rear View- Evening Bodice

Here’s a rear view with the ballgown bodice. Note that the ballgown bodice back lacks any peplum and just curves down ending in a sharp point. Both rear views of the skirt give a good view of the train which is free of any sort of adornment or decoration.

Rear View- Ballgown Style Bodice

Below is a close-up view of one of the sleeves on the reception bodice:

Close-Up Reception Bodice Sleeve

And finally, a close-up of the reception bodice front:

Close-Up Reception Bodice Front

And finally, the shoes that were worn with the dress:

This ensemble is a relatively simple but elegant and practical ensemble that would have been useful for a wide variety of formal events and it reveals a practical side to fashion that one doesn’t normally associate with this period. Stay tuned for more as we delve further into 1880s fashion. 🙂


Some Late 1880s Style

Just to change things up, today we take a brief look at the other end of the spectrum with the late 1880s with specifically, this circa 1889 evening/reception dress from Kent State University Museum:

Mme. Ludinart, 129 Boul. St.-Honoré, Paris, Evening/Reception Dress, c. 1889; Kent State University Museum (1983.001.0202 ab)

Here’s a better view (unfortunately most of the photos are lower resolution):

The dress is constructed of a mauve/cream-colored silk brocade covered with a cream-colored chiffon with white dots. The hem is relatively simple, consisting of a taupe-colored ruched silk band (it was probably more of an ivory color when initially constructed but has yellowed a bit with age). The bodice is also fairly plain with no sleeves and trimmed with lace around the neckline that matches the hem color. One interesting style detail is the use of taupe-colored silk ribbons on the shoulders that are shaped in a sort of rosette pattern with long tails. While it definitely provides a point of focus that attracts the viewer, it’s a bit distracting.

In terms of silhouette, the train is fairly restrained and we don’t see the more extreme style common to the 1885-1888 time frame. However, looking at the hem and how it curves downward towards the rear, there probably was a more pronounced bustle/padding effect going on so who knows? 🙂 Finally there’s the train which is made of a champagne/gold-colored silk satin with darker gold-colored vertical strips of silk faille with a jacquard floral pattern. Below are two views of the train (fortunately one is higher resolution):

One interesting detail is that the bodice back appears to match the train, creating the visual effect of a continuous flowing train running up the bodice, although the train and bodice are separate pieces.

And here’s a close-up of the silk jacquard faille ribbon strips. Note the horizontal ribs:

Overall, this is an interesting that places most of its style emphasis on the train and when looking at the back and front, it’s almost like we’re looking at two different dresses. The large ribbons at the shoulders are a bit of a distraction but ultimately that’s a matter of personal taste. This is an interesting late 1880s dress and in looking at it, there’s little hint of the style changes that were to occur in the 1890s.


Happy Birthday Charles Worth!

Happy Birthday Charles Worth! Born October 13, 1825, Charles Worth was a pioneer in the development of the fashion industry and laid the foundation for many key details of the fashion world that survive to this day. In commemoration of the day, albeit belated, here’s an interesting circa 1878 reception dress he created: 🙂

Worth, Reception Dress, c. 1878; FIDM Museum (2006.25.2AB)

This skirt and base bodice of this dress is constructed from a black silk velvet combined with sleeves of a dark gold covered in black lace with black beaded passmentarie. More black beaded passmentarie covers the front skirt and bodice front. Below is a close-up of the front bodice:

And here’s a view of the rear upper shoulders and neck:

And here’s a rear profile view:

In terms of the age of the dress, it would appear that the skirt is fuller than what would be expected for a natural form/Mid-Bustle Era dress silhouette. Also, the bodice  hem appears to be riding high on the hip, something that was done to optimize the drawing of the train to the rear through use of a bustle. Of course, it could also be a matter of staging, without viewing it in person it can often be hard to tell. Time-wise, we’re inclined to place this one more towards 1875-1876. Well, hopefully we’ll one day have an opportunity to view this dress in person but in the meantime, enjoy the pictures and once again, happy birthday Charles Worth!



The Ensemble Dress From Maison Worth, Redux

In a previous post, we commented on the ensemble dress, a sub-style that was popularized by Charles Worth consisting of a combination day and evening dress consisting of a base skirt and two separate bodices for day and night wear. Today we feature another example of this style that was made around 1888, starting with the day bodice:

Worth Combination Day/Evening Dress, c. 1888; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.1093a–e)

The overskirt and bodice of this dress appear to have been constructed from an apricot silk, most likely taffeta or faille, combined with an underskirt constructed from a champagne silk satin covered in a gold floral brocade pattern. Here are some close-ups of the fashion fabric and the front underskirt:

Inset on each side are panels of gold silk satin covered in jeweled white lace which set-up the floral brocade underskirt. Compared to the skirts, the day bodice is fairly simple, constructed of the same apricot silk with a lace-up (or faux lace-up) front trimmed with an asymmetrical jeweled collar that starts out dense on the left side and thins out as it makes its way around the neck and down the front right side. Finally, the bodice features three-quarter sleeves trimmed in lace.

And now for the evening bodice:

Worth Combination Day/Evening Dress, c. 1888; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.1093a–e)

The evening bodice appears to be constructed of the same apricot silk as the day bodice and overskirt. Decorating the bodice front, shoulders, and neckline is a somewhat asymmetrical jeweled decorative pattern- note the ribbon bow on only the left shoulder. Below is another side view:

While this ensemble dress is somewhat more understated than some of Worth’s other ensemble dresses, it’s still a solid contender, presenting practicality with understated elegance.