Folkwear Patterns Now At Atelier Lily Absinthe!

We’re pleased to announce that we’re now distributors for Folkwear Patterns at Atelier Lily Absinthe! Here’s just a few of our personal favorites:

This pattern has clear, concise, easy to understand directions and construction is very simple with no surprises. This pattern is size-inclusive with sizes range from small through 3XL. Although it’s aimed at the early 1900s, this style will also work for the mid to late 1890s. To order, please go to our Etsy Store.

Edwardian Underthings is one of Folkwear’s earlier patterns, first being published in 1978 (it was one of our first historical patterns at a time when there weren’t many on the market), it’s been updated with inclusive sizing ranging from extra-small to 3XL. This is another pattern with clear instructions and construction is uncomplicated. With camisole, drawers, and petticoat, this is the perfect set to construct a basic set of Edwardian Era undergarments. Also, although it’s primarily focused on the Edwardian Era, it will also work for the late 1890s. To order, please order from our Etsy Store.

And for the men, there’s the Victorian Shirt! This is a basic shirt pattern that will work for the 1870 to 1900 time frame. This pattern is sized for men’s extra-small through extra-large (men’s sizes 30 1/2 through 48). To order, please order from our Etsy Store. These are only a few of our offerings and to see them all, please go to our Etsy Store at  Atelier Lily Absinthe.

For the Perfect Shirtwaist…

Can’t you see this as an 1890s shirtwaist and skirt? This is one of my favorites…it’s nearly a periwinkle blue with white woven stripe and super soft. There’s enough here for ALL of your “Anne of Green Gables” puffed sleeves needs.



Mid-1890s Spring Style

With the arrival of Spring, we tend to think in terms of linen and cotton and such as with this circa 1890s day dress:

Day Dress, c. 1895; Augusta Auctions Website

While the Augusta Auctions website describes this dress being made of cotton, it could have just as easily been linen but either way, it definitely reads as a warmer weather garment. This dress is of a style that consists of a skirt combined with what could be termed a waist worn over the skirt top. Of course, it also raises the question of when does a bodice become a waist or vice-versa? This dress seems to occupy that middle ground where sometimes it’s hard to determine; the bodice/waist is a little heavier than what we normally associate with the waist yet at the same time, it’s a bit more loosely structured that a standard dress bodice (or course, make no mistake, a corset was worn underneath).1For some more discussion on waists, click HERE. Here’s a couple more examples of this particular style:

The above French fashion plate illustrates this style nicely, albeit with a little variation; it’s clear that this was more of a youthful style and was especially useful when it came to outdoor activities:

And it would appear that this was a popular style as far back as the late 1880s with this pattern promotion in March 1889 issue of Demorest’s Family Magazine:

Below are some more views of the dress:

As can be seen from these pictures, the basic fashion fabric is a green/putty colored cotton with ivory stripes dress. White/ivory colored Guipure lace trims the bodice/waist. Finally, the shoulders are trimmed with black silk satin bows along with black silk satin belt and cuff stripes.

This is a simple yet elegant dress for the Spring and Summer and we especially envision this as the perfect seaside dress. 🙂



Group Portrait- 1890s Style

And just for something different, we found this interesting group image from the late 1890s illustrating warm weather daywear:

In this group portrait, one can see a variety of shirt waist styles ranging from the fairly plain to ones with elaborate pleating and ruching. Also, the two women with neck ties caught our eye- they’re very similar to an ascot. The skirts are fairly similar with no obvious adornment and topped off with sashes or belts. Finally, it must be noted that the hats overwhelm everything else and definitely catch the eye on first view- each one is unique and very elaborate styling. The one in the middle is especially interesting with it’s avian theme; it’s hard to tell if that’s a complete bird, just the wings, or something that simulates a bird. 😉 Ultimately, the shirt waist was one of the defining elements in 1890s fashion and the variety of styles and materials that they were used is amazing and it’s even more amazing seeing them in a period image. Stay tuned for more! 🙂

From the September 25, 1898 edition of the Los Angeles Times.