Some More On The Frock Coat…

It’s been awhile since we’ve posted in regard to men’s wear so here’s something that should remedy this. During the late 19th Century, the frock coat was one of the basics of men’s wardrobe, serving as both a garment formal as well as an everyday business coat. Just to set the stage, here’s an example of the frock coat in everyday use, albeit by way of a painting by Renoir:

Edgar Renoir At The Stock Exchange, 1878 – 1879

And for an extant example:

Frock Coat & Trousers, c. 1876; Kansas State University Museum (KSUM 1986.41.2 ab)

Compared to the 1850s/1860s version, this frock coat is tailored, following the lines of the human body in smooth, somewhat relaxed fashion.

Putting Fabric To Work…

I decided to use some of the magnificent yardage we’ve acquired on our trips to Europe to work and so here’s a shirt that I made utilizing an interesting cotton shirting that I found in London last year. This is a standard men’s shirt, circa 1880s-early 1900 that I just finished. Time to make a fashion statement the next time I’m in Tombstone!

First, the shirt (the camera really makes the colors pop)…

And the original fabric…

The Morning After…

Part of the fun going to the the Prior Attire Ball is the morning after where we typically spend Sunday out and about in  Bath in Victorian clothes. 🙂 First, we went to breakfast at the Pump Room:

And you can “take the waters of Bath”…

Afterwards, we had to work off that breakfast so we went rowing on the Avon River:

The Scenery was marvelous although I didn’t get much of a chance to look at it since I was rowing… 🙂

It was a beautiful day to go rowing- the weather was cool and crisp and my choice of outfit was perfect. Although it was a bit choppy at the start, my Boy Scout rowing techniques eventually kicked in (it’s been like 40 years) and things worked out perfectly. I’d definitely do it again! 🙂