Back In Stock- Raspberry Stripe Cotton Batiste Fabric!!!


We have secured an additional supply of the Raspberry Stripe Cotton Batiste fabric that so many you have been looking for! The stripe is woven (see detail where I pulled the threads) and it burns to a grey ash (see detail) stripes run parallel to the selvage. It’s 55″ wide with a soft hand and begs to be your next project…it reminds me of gowns worn in French Impressionist paintings! Sold by the yard at $5 per yard. To order, please contact us at info@lilyabsinthe.com.



Back By Popular Demand – Raspberry Stripe Cotton Batiste Fabric!!!

We have secured an additional supply of the Raspberry Stripe Cotton Batiste fabric that so many you have been looking for! The stripe is woven (see detail where I pulled the threads) and it burns to a grey ash (see detail) stripes run parallel to the selvage. It’s 55″ wide with a soft hand and begs to be your next project…it reminds me of gowns worn in French Impressionist paintings! Sold by the yard for $5 per yard. To order, please contact us at info@lilyabsinthe.com.



Some Mid-1880s Day Dress Style

When it comes to later 19th Century fashion, certain dresses are remarkable either because of their cut and silhouette, colors, or fabrics. Today we present this circa 1885 day dress that combines all of these elements:

Day Dress, c. 1885; Five Colleges and Historic Deerfield Museum Consortium (HD V.114)

In terms of silhouette, this dress follows a fairly typical mid-1880s style and there’s no surprises there but when we turn to the fashion fabric itself, it’s a completely different matter with wide vertical stripes combined with narrow stripes, all in the same  shade of purple.

The fashion fabric consists of a combination of wide vertical and narrow horizontal purple stripes over a dark ivory background.

And just for comparison, here’s are two examples of what was more the norm for striped dresses of the period:

Day Dress, c. 1880; The Museum at FIT (P92.21.1)

Day Dress, c. 1880s; From the collection of Alexandre Vassiliev

In contrast to the purple striped day dress, the above examples are all constructed of striped fashion fabrics, the stripes of different colors. While combining horizontal and vertical stripes was not unknown during the late 19th Century fabrics, it usually involved combinations of different colors. Let’s take a closer look at the dress details:

Upon closer examination, we see that the fashion fabric appears to be a faille- Bengaline, or perhaps a Fouillard, and that the the light areas between the stripes is a variegated ivory and black. Also, it’s interesting to note that the horizontal purple stripes are of a slightly darker shade of purple and that each “stripe” is actually three rows of pin-striping. When viewed at a distance, these pin-stripes merge in one strip.

And here’s a very tight close-up of the dress fabric. Note the cross-wise horizontal rib characteristic of a faille/Bengaline. Judging from the luster and drape, we estimate that this is a silk Bengaline or perhaps cotton and silk- it’s hard to say without further analysis. It’s also interesting that the horizontal stripes are not all one color but rather appear to have rows of a lighter ivory (?) alternating with the purple rows.

Some may find this dress to be visually jarring and that we our initial reaction. However, upon closer examination, we found that it contained some subtle nuances such as with the variegated ivory/black background and the three pin-striped horizontal stripes. Also, the fabric weave further enhances the stripe style.  This dress is certainly an interesting style that amply demonstrates that style is found in the details. 🙂



Angus’ Attic

Adam and Angus are now selling lengths of silk, with weekly additions from our weekly trips to downtown LA. If you’re within twenty miles of me and on my friend list…I’ll deliver it personally (with Angus and Fiona along for the ride) and you can skip the delivery fee!). I’m the one choosing the silks, so check them out before I start claiming them for my studio. What’s different about what we’re doing? Unlike other “sellers” on other platforms, we actually purchase the silk ahead of time and it’s here at the house already. You’re also not buying from my personal stash (I’m keeping that!), these are just selections that I think are beautiful. Check us out at Angus’ Attic.

 



A Quick Turn At No. 11- The Parlor Makeover

Old houses=Brrrrr! Lots of changes here at No. 11 and we haven’t left the house since we got here, which is typical. Now that the parlor pelmet is put up, we can finish the soft furnishings for this place. Old houses tend to tell you what “they” want, one can’t force it. Things that are perfect for a snowy climate just aren’t appropriate for the US Southwest…it only took me twenty years to learn that lesson! Next trip…bring a ladder. 🙂

Next trip’s project…the two main room windows. Looking for some vintage olive and blue striped linen to go with the embroidered borders I have, then I can properly hem those antique net curtains so the linen lace shows. Ugh* those victorians are just too complicated!

This morning’s coffee and reading spot. There will be a nap, I’m sure.

That danged pelmet1A pelmet is that covered structure at the top of the window covering up the curtain rod for the curtains. is completely hand finished, mitered, padded and pattern matched. 😳 Never Again! When we bring back a ladder, I can trim off the excess and hand stitch it closed. For now…I am happy.

Their new napping and barking spot. Sorry, neighbors!