The Panier Polonaise- Part 3

And now we present our take on the “Panier Polonaise” style with this spring/summer promenade dress:

This dress is constructed of a Liberty London cotton print fabric trimmed with antique lace and Aesthetic Era enameled cut steel buttons:

Below are some details:

The hem is a knife-pleated silk striae fabric:

And for a few more views:

We intend on making a number of similar dresses from Liberty print cotton fabrics that we brought back with us from London so stay tuned for more details! 🙂


The Panier Polonaise- Part 2

Previously, as part of our discussion on early 1880s fashion, we described the “Panier Polonaise” style a bit. Today, we present an example of this style from our collection that dates from the early 1880s. Unfortunately, there’s no label inside or other way to pinpoint the precise year of construction.

The bodice and skirt are constructed of a plum-colored silk taffeta (we actually conducted a burn test on some fibers taken from the interior). On the skirt sides, the fabric has been draped and held in place by strips of ruched self-fabric trim.  The same self-fabric trim also runs along the hem.

Below are some views of the bodice.  It’s cut in the style of a polonaise with long edges towards on the front that are sharply drawn up towards the rear. The same style of self-fabric trim are used on each side of the bodice front and the sleeve cuffs. Note the tiny ruched “parasol pocket”… 🙂 It was handy for holding a handkerchief (or not).

Below is a view of one of the polonaise bodice sides, again trimmed in the same self-fabric trim as the other parts of the skirt and bodice. The hem is gathered up towards the rear and one can see the detail:

And here’s a view of the bodice back. The sides drape over the hips while the rear is drawn up short.

Below are two views of the bodice interior. As was standard with most late 19th Century bodices, they were lightly boned to maintain the bodice’s shape (they were NOT meant to replace the corset). Although it’s not easy to make out from the picture, the lining fabric is a plain cotton muslin.

This is truly a remarkable example of early 1880s style and we’ll be posting some more pictures of it soon.

To be continued…


And More Original Inspiration…

Some bodices break the rules! She never had a petersham at the waistline, most of the seams aren’t finished off, there’s been no obvious size alterations throughout the years. Yet…she’s pretty as a picture, and was carefully tended by someone many years ago. 🙂

 



And For Original Inspiration…

Details! I love the hand-drawn fringe, the pretty pleated watch pocket, and a complete set of her original buttons. It’s so lucky that there’s no silk shattering, so when I’m done today, back to her tissue-stuffed box she goes! 🙂



Inspiration Dress

This is the back of the inspiration dress that I patterned for my blue cotton dress. It’s from a suit of three pieces (princess seamed semi-polonaise, foundation skirt, and detachable train) that appears to have been a special occasion dress, not a designer dress…but most likely created by a local dressmaker or seamstress.