Pingat-1880s Style

Today we take a look at one of Pingat’s earlier works, in this case an evening cloak/coat from the later part of the 1880s (circa 1885-1889). Compared to previous examples we’ve posted from the 1890s, this cloak takes a completely different silhouette characteristic of late 1880s style. Here are a few views:

Pingat, Evening Cloak, c. 1885-1889; Metropolitan Museum of Art (2009.300.484)

This cloak is constructed from an floral-patterned ivory silk jacquard combined with a peach velvet with dark peach/gold appliques that creates a two-tone effect. In terms of silhouette, this cloak is somewhat of a hybrid in that it combines the upper body and sleeve styles characteristic of mantles with a long coat style on the bottom. The cloak shape closely follows the classic late 1880s dress style, allowing ample room for the bustled train.

One can get a fairly good view of the peach-colored fashion fabric that’s on the front , back, and lower sleeves. It appears to be a close-napped velvet but of course, this is speculation given the lack of any specific details on the museum website or a close physical examination. 😉

Three-Quarter Back View

Close-up of back detail.

From this close-up of the back, one can get a good look at the contrasting silk brocade floral fabric versus the deeper peach velvet fabric and it’s applique decorative design. Cloaks and mantles provided a large canvas for the designer to utilize all manner of decorative effects and Pingat was definitely one to use this to maximum extent; this particular example not only sees a combination of different design styles but does so in a harmonious way. Victorian Era outerwear has always been a source of fascination for us in that it combines the practical and utilitarian with the artistic and while each designer had their own take on this, Pingat’s was especially unique. We’ll be hunting for more interesting examples to post here so stay tuned. 🙂



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